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Women’s History Month 2022

by Dentist Inglewood

As we transition from February to March, we also transition from Black History Month to Women’s History Month. Although Black History Month is over, this does not mean that we end the discussion, we at New Image Dental in Inglewood continue the celebration of Black Women’s achievements, culture, and hardships.

Women have been essential in shaping history, but their achievements have often been forgotten. March gives us the time to reflect on their contributions to United States History. This year’s theme is “Women Providing Healing, Promoting Hope” which honors frontline workers as we continue to live through the Coronavirus Pandemic. Additionally, it recognizes the ways in which women, past and present, have played a critical role in providing healing and hope.

The Beginning of Womens Month

Women’s History Month began as a Women’s History Week in 1980. The week always feels on March 8th which is International Women’s Day. Starting in Santa Rosa, California, this movement soon spread across the nation. By 1986, 14 states proclaimed March as Women’s History Month and in 1987 Congress passed a law officially declaring March as Women’s History Month.

When we celebrate this month, we mainly acknowledge white women’s achievements, but it is important to recognize and celebrate Black Women as well. These do not have to be famous women or advocates, they are our mothers, teachers, healthcare workers, and politicians. As so, it is important to recognize Kamala Harris, the first woman and Black woman to be Vice President of the United States. Her accomplishments inspire many who look like her to strive and make a change.

Barack Obama Presidential Proclamation

In 2016, Barack Obama in his Women’s History Month Presidential Proclamation stated, “In the face of discrimination and undue hardship, they have never given up on the promise of America: that with hard work and determination, nothing is out of reach. During Women’s History Month, we remember the trailblazers of the past, including the women who are not recorded in our history books, and we honor their legacies by carrying forward the valuable lessons learned from the powerful examples they set.”

Here are some important Black Women who have made history:

Oprah Winfrey

The first Black woman to become a billionaire in 2003. She is one of the world’s most generous philanthropists and is the vision of black excellence.

Barbara Jordan

The first Black woman to be elected to Congress from the South. Barbara started off as the first Black woman in the Texas state Senate, but her ambition led her to represent Texas in the U. S. House of Representatives in 1972. She famously stated, “I’ll only be one of 435. But the 434 will know I’m there.”

Mae C. Jemison

This physician and NASA astronaut was the first black woman to fly into space on September 12, 1999.

Bessie Colman

Bessie was the first Black woman to receive a pilot license in 1921. Back then, there were no opportunities for women or people of color to learn to fly, so she traveled to France to study aviation. Her goal was to open an aviation school for Black and although she died young, her legacy lives on through her students.

Alice Coachman

Alice was the first Black woman to win an Olympic Gold Medal. At 25, she competed in the high jump finals in London. Although she was still in recovery from a back injury, she was still able to persevere and win.

These are a few of the many successful and inspiring Black women that we honor during Women’s History Month. Although the fight for equality is not over, these women’s achievements despite their hardships inspire a greater future.